Viral Videos on YouTube by Jamie Danjoux

In this blog post, I’m going to talk about videos that have gone viral on YouTube.  You may be thinking, “What the heck has this got to do with anything about being d/Deaf?”

Most viral videos may involve people talking (in order to get the funniness bit) however not a lot of these YouTube clips get subtitled (in my opinion) and that’s the job of YouTube Auto Caption, right? This feature I would say is completely useless.  It tries to listen to the clip and guess what’s being said.  This feature hardly works when I’ve used it.

A great example is a video that went Viral in June last year, it was a airline flight attendant performing the safety demonstration and had included very humorous jokes.  When I first watched the video I was having to rely on others to ask what was being said, so to me it wasn’t quite enjoyable. Recently I added captions to the end of the video title and a different version of the video was found which had subtitles along with the video. This made it much easier to understand and more enjoyable!

This is not the only example but many videos on YouTube don’t have subtitles and can be difficult for us deafies to understand what is being said.

The fact that not much content on YouTube is not at all their fault, however placing a automated closed captioning facility is a bit annoying due to it being unreliable at most times.

Do you struggle to watch YouTube (or any other online videos) clips? How do you pull through what’s being said? Whenever I go on YouTube, I try to get the background of the video and think what’s being said, and if that doesn’t work then I resort to the comments and see if they give any idea.

I wish there would be more people out there who can add subtitles to viral videos so all of them can take part in the great Internet sensation – after all why should we miss out?

‘Til next time!

Jamie

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6 thoughts on “Viral Videos on YouTube by Jamie Danjoux

  1. Reblogged this on CCAC Blog and commented:
    A nice note from friends in the UK about something concerning us all globally. CCAC sends many advocacy messages to many networks about the same issue, over a long time. ALL invited to use CCAC as the umbrella (hub) for local and national advocacy too. http://CCACaptioning.org has many resources, including how to edit YT craptions (machine) and more. Cheers for everyone who spreads the words.

  2. I’m unsure all accessible youtube is welcome, or wanted ! E.G. the recent ‘viral’ vid by IS went viral, NOT with CC, but via sign language, is there CC policy on condemning such viral vids ? I rather fear deaf will get more interested in viral vids that are signed, not captioned, what do others feel ?

    • Evening Mervyn, I can understand that some ‘viral’ videos may be the horrific upsetting IS videos. These shouldn’t be on YT in the first place. I prefer for videos to be captioned, however this is a personal preference.

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